The Body by Science Book

Clients often come to us because of Doug McGuff’s book “Body by Science”.  In the book, John Little, a columnist for Ironman magazine, and fitness medicine expert Dr. Doug McGuff, team up to present a formula that builds strength and develops muscle using slow motion training.  The information is well presented and makes a clear case for the efficiency and safety of that method.  Whether you’re considering joining us at Ultimate or simply want to gain better understanding about the slow training workout you’re doing with our fitness trainers, you’ll find this book informative. While slow training is at the core of Ultimate Fitness’ philosophy, what sets us apart from the book’s very purist approach is that we believe our clients get better overall results from a varied and personalized exercise program. Call us to learn more about what we do, or even better, call us to make an “orientation” appointment. We’ll talk about your health and fitness goals and take you through a sample slow workout. You’ll see, you’ll love it! And who can’t make time to workout 30 minutes twice a...
Sitting Down is Deadly!

Sitting Down is Deadly!

Recent research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine and the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, suggests that people who spend a lot of time sitting (causing prolonged lack of whole body muscle movement) are more likely to be overweight, have heart attacks, possibly certain types of cancer, and even die sooner than those who do less sitting.  And that is regardless of whether or not someone exercises. Figures from a U.S. survey in 2003-2004 found Americans spend more than half their time sitting, from working at their desks, sitting in cars, and watching television. After four hours of sitting (resulting in complete muscle inactivity), the body starts sending signals to shut down glucose and fat regulating genes.  According to one study, a woman’s risk of metabolic syndrome, a precursor to diabetes and heart disease, jumps 26% for every extra hour she sits in front of the TV.  Another study shows that sitting 6 or more hours a day makes someone up to 40% likelier to die within 15 years than someone who sits less than 3 hours a day.  Shocking isn’t it? There are guidelines suggesting we exercise at least 30 minutes a day but what about guidelines limiting the amount of consecutive sitting we do?  Until there is such advice, the more you can get up and take breaks from sitting during your work, the better.  You can also climb the stairs instead of taking the elevator, walk to the store rather than drive, or take a walk around your neighborhood after dinner.  Last but not least, exercise more vigorously at least 3 times a week...